Gramvikash
Access to Services Award by Bihar Innovation Forum-II awarded to Gram Vikas on 31st January 2014   
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titlepointMANTRA - Experiences of Gram Vikas

“Our village is better than the town. We have 24*7 piped water supply to all families, without exception. Every family has their own toilet and bathing room as well. When we seek marriage alliances, our daughters ask us – ‘ would there ...
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Vision & Mission

The logo of Gram Vikas denotes the coming together of two hands, in a partnership. The two hands together also make a heart. The logo defines the spirit of Gram Vikas.

 


 

Vision Statement
An equitable and sustainable society where people live in peace with dignity.

 


 

Mission Statement
Gram Vikas' Mission is to promote processes which are sustainable, socially inclusive and gender equitable to enable critical masses of poor and marginalized rural people or communities to achieve a dignified quality of life.

 


 

Understanding the Vision and Mission


 



What do we mean by Community?
'Community' is defined as a group of families living within a defined geographic area. This group is governed by social, cultural, economic and political bonds or norms. Gram Vikas works at the 'community' level within these boundaries to initiate processes that are socially inclusive and gender equitable. The 'community' has a critical role to play with regard to engaging with the State. In Orissa's context, the members of the Palli Sabha comes closest to Gram Vikas' definition of a 'community'.

 


 

What do we mean by dignified quality of life?
In our perception 'dignified quality of life' of people or communities would be characterized by:

  • Assured access to basic education and adequate health services
  • Sustainable use and management of natural resources
  • Food security and access to secured livelihood opportunities
  • Options for appropriate family and community infrastructure and sources of energy
  • Strong self-governing people's institutions with equal participation of men and women

A minimum or 'threshold' level of quality of life is essential for communities to be able to govern themselves - politically, economically, socially and culturally, and achieve what is rightfully theirs, both from the State and the Market, in a sustainable and self-perpetuating manner. 'Communities' having reached a 'threshold quality of life' must be able to bring their energies together to form 'critical masses' to be able to bargain with the Market and the State, for effective returns and for demanding their rights.

 


 

What do we mean by 'critical masses'?
'Critical masses' are defined as groups of 'conscientised' people who have developed pressure-group mechanisms and democratic governance systems within their own communities. They draw strength from such experiences and encounters and develop sufficient strength to bargain with or influence their external environment. They collectively demand their rights and are capable of bringing about changes that they desire. Critical masses are sought to be energized from the village level through Gram Panchayats, upto the state level. 'Critical masses' are driven by quality as well as quantity, signifying that they are contextually defined, comprised of physical numbers, but also effectiveness and strength. Critical masses are sought to be energized from the village level through Gram Panchayats, up to the state level. 'Critical masses' are driven by quality as well as quantity, signifying that they are contextually defined, comprise of physical numbers, and are effective and strong.